info@fortgreenepups.org

(718) 623-3762

Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn NY, 11205

©2018 by Fort Greene PUPS. Illustrations by Sarah Wedge. Configured by Brown Stone Studio with Wix.com

Official Rules of Fort Greene Park

Dogs are allowed off-leash in Fort Greene Park from 9:00 pm until 9:00 am. Please take responsibility for your dog's actions, by

 

  • Picking up after your dog. It is the law ($1,000 fine for violation) and it's also just plain considerate!

  • Leashing your dog between the hours of 9:00 am and 9:00 pm. There is a $100 fine for violation of this law, which is in effect year-round.

  • Not letting your dog play in the tennis courts. Dog nails scratch the surface

  • Not letting them dig holes. Holes create a nasty trip hazard. If it happens, please try to fill it

  • Remaining near your dog when off-leash

Also:

  • Do not allow your dog off-leash unless you have trained it to recall.

  • Please (gently) let someone know if their dog has pooped and they did not see it. Dogs generally make one poop per park visit. Please pay attention!

  • Don't throw a ball for your dog across paths, especially on weekdays when people are walking to work

  • Rotate the areas in which you let your dog play off-leash. The park lawns are fragile and we can help by rotating our dogs to less stressed areas of the park

  • Be attentive with your unneutered dog. Some unneutered males are aggressive, or provoke aggression in other dogs. Females in heat should not be brought into the park, even leashed.

 

What To Do During a Dog Fight

 

First, be sure it was a fight. Dogs are not people, and they communicate differently. If a dog rushes your dog or barks at it, but does not bite it, it is not a fight. Your best bet would be to avoid each other in the park.

 

That said, dog fights happen. Always pay close attention to your dog when it is off-leash in case there is an aggression incident. But also be mindful there is always assumed risk when entering any off-leash area.

 

If there is an issue or a fight, once the animals are separated, treat the occurrence like an auto accident.

 

  • Was any person or animal hurt? Determine if an emergency veterinary or hospital visit is needed. The two closest emergency veterinary clinics are Blue Pearl (718 596-0099) and VERG (718 522-9400). The Brooklyn Hospital Center is the closest hospital (adjacent to the park)

  • Get documentation. Get the dog owner’s name and number; dog license and rabies tag numbers (both required by NYC Board of Health); and pictures, especially if an owner does not want to give information. 

  • Note the facts. Was it harmless play turned aggressive, or did one dog attack another for no apparent reason? (Remember it might not be apparent to you, but it may have been to the dogs.) Observe dog control methods. Was the owner paying attention? How did the owner handle their dog?

  • What was the situation? Was one dog on a leash? Dogs on leashes should be respected, otherwise they would not be on a leash. A common situation is for off-leash animals to provoke leashed animals for fun, then the leashed dog responds aggressively. Pay attention and show respect for leashed dogs during off-leash hours.

 

Once the situation settles down, if it is unclear which dog was the aggressor, leash both dogs as quickly as possible. If a bite has already occurred, exchange the required NYC Board of Health license and rabies tag documentation, plus name and contact information.

 

Please note that neither PUPS nor the park director has law enforcement authority and therefore, do not intervene, investigate, or otherwise get involved in these matters. It is advised that dog owners work things out between themselves.

 

If you still want to report an aggressive animal, you can file a report with the NYPD or the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which will work in coordination with the NYCACC.